Taking up trout fishing

Over the last few weeks, the Rib Valley trout have been feeding on various different flies close to or on the surface. This photo shows the stomach contents of one fish – midge pupa, mayfly, honey bee, a small black fly I can’t identify and a couple of buzzer shucks:

Trout stomach contents

At times it has been difficult to know what fly to use. I have had a few trout on this floating pattern which resembles a number of different natural insects:

Dry sedge

The suspender buzzer, representing a midge pupa hanging at the surface, has also been effective:

Suspender buzzer

Even when the trout seem to be preoccupied with natural prey, they will still sometimes take non-imitative lures like the black and green:

Black and green lure

Dan and James had signed up for my fly fishing course because they wanted to try something a bit different after years of coarse fishing. When it came to their fishing session, conditions were ideal with an overcast sky and a decent breeze:

Fly casting

Using the black and green lure, it didn’t take long for James to connect with his first ever trout, which he duly landed:

James's first trout

After 20 minutes, nothing had shown any interest in Dan’s damsel nymph, so with fish moving in front of us it was clearly time for a change. I rigged him up with a suspender buzzer on the point and a normal sinking buzzer on a dropper. This is the ‘washing line’ rig which keeps the dropper fly fishing close to the surface. It was soon proven to be the right choice, with this nicely marked rainbow taking the sunk buzzer:

Dan's first trout

Dan could probably have had a couple more fish; he missed one due to slack line, and I saw another take his point fly, but he didn’t realise.


The next day Louis came for the second part of his fly fishing course, having done the initial casting lesson a few weeks back. The morning was a brief escape from work for him, as he was due back in the office later on.

Conditions were a bit different now – bright and warm with virtually no breeze – so I thought we might struggle.

We rigged up the washing line and started fishing in stealth mode, staying back from the water’s edge in case the fish were close in:

Close range fly fishing

Trout were indeed rising occasionally just a short distance out, sometimes very close to the flies:

Close range fly fishing

After about ten minutes there was a heavy boil where I thought Louis’s point fly was. He did not react at first so I shouted out “it’s you”, prompting him to strike. It is very easy to miss these surface feeding fish, but luckily he connected:

Louis's first trout

Louis had no more action after that, but he was happy to have caught his first trout and would no doubt be daydreaming about it later on, back at his desk!